FICTION

There are many different types of narrative genres that can be used in the classroom.

susan-yin-647448-unsplash.jpg

Here is a list of some of the most popular:

  • Adventure stories - usually presents danger, or gives the reader a sense of excitement.
  • Mystery or crime stories - usually involving a mysterious death or a crime to be solved.
  • Fairy tale stories - about fairies or other magical creatures.
  • Stories from other countries and cultures – traditional stories from countries around the world, based on customs and beliefs from that country.
  • Legends - sometimes of a national or folk hero, that has a basis in fact but also includes imaginative material.
  • Mythological stories - legend or traditional narrative, often based in part on historical events that reveals human behaviour and natural phenomena by its symbolism; often pertaining to the actions of the gods.
  • Fables - legendary, supernatural tale demonstrating a useful truth.
  • Stories with historical settings - story with fictional characters and events in an historical setting.
  • Stories set in imaginary worlds and Science fiction - story based on the impact of actual, imagined, or potential science, often set in the future or on other planets.
  • Magical realism - story where magical or unreal elements play a natural part in an otherwise realistic environment.
  • Fantasy stories - fiction in a unreal setting that often includes magic, magical creatures, or the supernatural.
  • Folklore - the songs, stories, myths, and proverbs of a people or "folk" as handed down by word of mouth.
  • Flashbacks – short stories which go back in time and the narrator is the characters thoughts.
  • Ghost and scary stories - fiction in which events evoke a feeling of dread and sometimes fear in both the characters and the reader.
  • Comics/Graphic novels - comic magazine or book based on a sequence of pictures (often hand drawn) and few words.
  • Western stories - fiction set in the American Old West frontier and typically in the late eighteenth to late nineteenth century.
  • Tall tales - humorous story with blatant exaggerations, such as swaggering heroes who do the impossible with nonchalance.